Servers

Detecting and Correlating Server Failures to NoSQL Log Events
Resolving Server Failures
Terminology Review
Assumptions
Replacement Procedure 1: Replace SN with Identical SN
Replacement Procedure 2: New SN Takes Over Duties of Removed SN
Examples
Setup
Example 1: Replace a Failed SN with an Identical SN
Verification
Example 2: New SN Takes Over Duties of Existing SN
Verification

Although not as common as a failed disk, it is not unusual for an administrator to need to replace one of the machines hosting services making up a given KVStore deployment (an SN). There are two common scenarios where a whole machine replacement may occur. The first is when one or more hardware components fail and it is more convenient or cost effective to simply replace the whole machine than it is to replace the failed components. The second is when a working, healthy machine is to be upgraded to a machine that is bigger and robust; for example, a machine with larger disks and better performance characteristics. The procedures presented in this section are intended to describe the steps for preparing a new machine to replace an existing machine, and the steps for retiring the existing machine.

Detecting and Correlating Server Failures to NoSQL Log Events

In a distributed such as Oracle NoSQL Database, it is generally difficult to distinguish between network outages and machine failure. The HA components of the NoSQL Database detects when a replication node is unreachable and logs this as an event in the admin log - however grepping for this log event produces false positives. Therefore it is recommended to utilize a systems monitoring package like SNMP or JMX to detect machine/server failure.

Resolving Server Failures

Two replacement procedures are presented below. Both procedures essentially achieve the same results, and both will result in one or more network restore processes being performed (see below).

The first procedure presented replaces the old machine with a machine that – to all interested parties – looks exactly like the original machine. That is, the new machine has the same hostname, IP address, port, and SN id. Compare this with the second procedure; where the old machine is removed from the store's topology and replaced with a machine that appears to be a different machine - different hostname, IP address, SN id – but the behavior is identical to the behavior of the replaced machine. That is, the new machine runs the same services, and manages the exact same data, as the original machine; it just happens to have a different network and SN identity. Thus, the first case can be viewed as a replacement of only the hardware; that is, from the point of view of the store, the original SN was temporarily taken down and then restarted. The new hardware is not reflected in the store's topology. In the other case, the original SN is removed, and a different SN takes over the original's duties. Although the store's content and behavior hasn't changed, the change in hardware is reflected in the store's new topology.

When determining which procedure to use when replacing a storage node, the decision is left to the discretion of the store administrator. Some administrators prefer to always use only one of the procedures, never the other. And some administrators establish a policy that is based on some preferred criteria. For example, you might imagine a policy where the first procedure is employed whenever SN replacement must be performed because the hardware has failed; whereas the second procedure is employed whenever healthy hardware is to be upgraded with newer/better hardware. In the first case, the failed SN is down and unavailable during the replacement process. In the second case, the machine to be replaced can remain up and available while the new machine is being prepared for migration; after which the old machine can be shut down and removed from the topology.

Terminology Review

It may be useful to review some of the terminology introduced in the Oracle NoSQL Database Getting Started Guide as well as the Oracle NoSQL Database Administrator's Guide. Recall from those documents that the physical machine on which the processes of the KVStore run is referred to as a storage node, or SN; where a typical KVStore deployment generally consists of a number of machines – that is, a number of SNs – that execute the processes and software services provided by the Oracle NoSQL Database KVStore. Recall also that when the KVStore software is initially started on a given SN machine, a process referred to as the "Storage Node Agent" (or the SNA) is started. Then, once the SNA is started, the KVStore administrative CLI is used to configure the store and deploy a "topology"; which results in the SNA executing and managing the lifecycle of one or more "services" referred to as "replication nodes" (or RN services). Finally, in addition to starting and managing RN services, the SNA also optionally (depending on the configuration) starts and manages another service type referred to as the "admin" service.

Because of the 1-to-1 correspondence between the machines making up a given KVStore deployment and the SNA process initially started on each machine when installing and deploying a store, the terms "storage node", "SN", or "SNx" (where x is a positive integer) are often used interchangeably in the Oracle NoSQL Database documents – including this note – when referring to either the machine on which the SNA is running, or the SNA process itself. Which concept is intended should be clear from the context in which the term is used in a given discussion. For example, when the terms SN3 or sn3 are used below as part of a discussion about hardware issues such as machine failure and recovery, that term refers to the physical host machine running an SNA process that has been assigned the id value 3 and is identified in the store's topology with the string "sn3". In other contexts, for example when the behavior of the store's software is being discussed, the term SN3 and/or sn3 would refer to the actual SNA process running on the associated machine.

Although not directly pertinent to the discussion below, the following terms are presented not only for completeness, but also because it may be useful to understand their implications when trying to determine which SN replacement procedure to employ.

First, recall from the Oracle NoSQL Database documents that the RN service(s) that are started and managed by each SNA are represented in the store's topology by their service identification number (a positive integer), in conjunction with the identification number of the replication group – or "shard" – in which the service is a member. For example, a given store's topology may reference a particular RN service with the string, "rg3-rn2"; which represents the RN service having id equal to 2 that is a member of the replication group (that is, the shard) with id 3. The capacity then, of a given SN machine that is operating as part of a given KVStore cluster is the number of RN services that will be started and managed by the SNA process deployed to that SN host. Thus, if the capacity of a given SN is 1, only a single RN service will be started and managed by that SN. On the other hand, if the capacity is 3 (for example), then 3 RN services will be started and managed by that SN, and each RN will typically belong to a different replication group (share).

With respect to the SN host machines and resident SNA processes that are deployed to a given KVStore, two concepts to understand are the concept of a "zone", and the concept of a "pool" of storage nodes. Both concepts correspond to mechanisms that are used to organize the SNs of the store into groups. As a result, the distinction between the two concepts is presented below.

When configuring a KVStore for deployment, it is a requirement that at least one "zone" be deployed to the store before deploying any storage nodes. Then, when deploying each SNA process, in addition to specifying the desired host, one of the previously deployed zones must also be specified; which, with respect to the store's topology, will "contain" that SNA, as well as the services managed by that SNA. Thus, the KVStore deployment process produces a a store consisting of one or more zones, where a distinct set of storage nodes belongs to (is a member of) one – and only one – of those zones.

In contrast to a zone, rather than being "deployed" to the store, one or more storage node "pools" can be (optionally) "created" within the store. Once such a "pool" is created, any deployed storage node can then be configured to "join" that pool, as well as any other pool that has been created. This means that, unlike zones, where the store consists of one or more zones containing disjoint sets of the deployed SNs, the store can also consist of one or more "pools", where there is no restriction on which, or how many, pools a given SN joins. Every store is automatically configured with a default pool named, "AllStorageNodes"; which all deployed storage nodes join. The creation of any additional pools is optional, and left to the discretion of the deployer; as is the decision about which pools a given storage node joins.

Besides the differences described above, there are additional conceptual differences to understand when using zones and pools to group sets of storage nodes. Although zones can be used to represent logical groupings of a store's nodes, crossing physical boundaries, deployers generally map them to real, physical locations. For example, although there is nothing to prevent the deployment of multiple SNA processes to a single machine, where each SNA is deployed to a different zone, more likely than not, a single SNA will be deployed to a single machine, and the store's zones along with the SN machines within each zone will generally be defined to correspond to physical locations that provide some form of fault isolation. For example, each zone may be defined to correspond to a separate floor of a building; or to separate buildings, a few miles apart (or even across the country).

Compare how zones are used with how pools are generally used. A single pool may represent all of the storage nodes across all zones; where the default pool is one such pool. On the other hand, multiple pools may be specified; in some cases with no relation between the pools and zones, and in other cases with each pool corresponding to a zone and containing only the nodes belonging to that zone. Although there may be reasons to map a set of storage node pools directly to the store's zones, this is not the primary intent of pools. Whereas the intent of zones is to enable better fault isolation and geographic availability via physical location of the storage nodes, the primary purpose of a pool is to provide a convenient mechanism for referring to a group of storage nodes when applying a given administrative operation. That is, the administrative store operations that take a pool argument can be called once to apply the desired operation to all storage nodes belonging to the specified pool, avoiding the need to execute the operation multiple times; once for each storage node.

Associated with zones, another term to understand is "replication factor" (or "rf"). Whenever a zone is deployed to a KVStore, the "replication factor" of that zone must be specified; which represents the number of copies (or "replicas") of each key/value pair to write and maintain on the nodes of the associated zone. Note that whereas "capacity" is a per/SN concept that specifies the number of RN services to manage on a given machine, the "replication factor" is a concept whose scope is per/zone, and is used to determine the number of RN services that belong to each shard (or "replication group") created and managed within the associated zone.

Finally, a "network restore" is a process whereby the store automatically recovers all data previously written by a given RN service; retrieving replicas of the data from one or more RN services running on different SNs and then transferring that data (across the network) to the RN whose database is being restored. It is important to understand the implications this process may have on system performance; as the process can be quite time consuming, and can add significant network traffic and load while the data store of the restored RN is being repopulated. Additionally, with respect to SN replacement, these implications can be magnified when the capacity of the SN to be replaced is greater than 1; as this will result in multiple network restorations being performed.

Assumptions

When presenting the two procedures below, for simplicity, assume that a KVStore is initially deployed to 3 machines, resulting in a cluster of 3 storage nodes; sn1, sn2, sn3 on hosts with names, host-sn1, host-sn2, and host-sn3 respectively. Assume that:

  • Each machine has a disk named /opt and a disk named /disk1; where each SN will store its configuration and admin database under /opt/ondb/var/kvroot, but will store the data that is written on the other, separate disk under /disk1/ondb/data.

  • The KVStore is installed on each machine under /opt/ondb/kv; that is,KVHOME=/opt/ondb/kv.

  • The KVStore is deployed with KVROOT=/opt/ondb/var/kvroot.

  • The KVStore is named "example-store".

  • One zone – named "Zone1" and configured with rf=3 – is deployed to the store.

  • Each SN is configured with capacity=1.

  • After deploying each SN to the zone named "Zone1", each SN joins the pool named "snpool".

  • In addition to the SNA and RN services, an admin service is also deployed to each machine; that is, admin1 is deployed to host-sn1 , admin2 is deployed to host-sn2, and admin3 is deployed to host-sn3, each listening on port 13230.

Using specific values such as those reflected in the Assumptions described above enables to follow the steps of each procedure. Combined with the information contained in the Oracle NoSQL Database Administrator's Guide, administrators can generalize and extend those steps to their own particular deployment scenario, substituting the values specific to the given environment where necessary.

Replacement Procedure 1: Replace SN with Identical SN

The procedure presented in this section describes how to replace the desired SN with a machine having an identical network and SN identity. A number of requirements must be satisfied before executing this procedure; which are:

  • An admin service must be running and accessible somewhere in the system.

  • The id of the SN to be replaced must be known.

  • The SN to be replaced must be taken down – either administratively or via failure – before starting the new SN.

An admin service is necessary so that the current configuration of the SN to be replaced can be retrieved from the admin service's database and packaged for installation on the new SN. Thus, before proceeding, the administrator must know the location (hostname or IP address) of the admin service, along with the port on which that service is listening for requests. Additionally, since this process requires the id of the SN to be replaced, the administrator must also know that value before initiating the procedure below; for example, something like, sn1, sn2, sn3, etc.

Finally, if the SN to be replaced has failed, and is down, the last requirement above is automatically satisfied. On the other hand, if the SN to be replaced is up, then at some point before starting the new SN, the old SN must be down so that that SN and the replacement SN do not conflict.

With respect to the requirement related to the admin service, if the system is running multiple instances of the admin, it is not important which instance is used in the steps below; just that the admin is currently running and accessible. This means that if the SN to be replaced is not only up but is also running an admin service, then that admin service can be used to retrieve and package that SN's current configuration. But if that SN has failed or is down or inaccessible for some reason, then any admin service on that SN is also down and/or inaccessible - which means an admin service running on one of the other SNs in the system must be used in the procedure below. This is why the Oracle NoSQL Database documents strongly encourage administrators to deploy multiple admin services; where the number deployed should make quorum loss less likely.

For example, it is obvious that if only 1 admin service was specified when deploying the store, and that service was deployed to the SN to be replaced, and that SN has failed or is otherwise inaccessible, then the loss of that single admin service makes it very difficult to replace the failed SN using the procedure presented here. Even if multiple admins are deployed – for example, 2 admins – and the failure of the SN causes just one of those admins to also fail and thus lose quorum, even though a working admin remains, it will still require additional work to recover quorum so that the admin service can perform the necessary duties to replace the failed SN.

Suppose a KVStore has been deployed as described in the section Assumptions. Also, suppose that the sn2 machine (whose hostname is, "host-sn2") has failed in some way and needs to be replaced. If the administrator wishes to replace the failed SN with an identical but healthy machine, then the administrator would do the following:

  1. If, for some reason, host-sn2 is running, shut it down.

  2. Log into host-sn1 (or host-sn3).

  3. From the command line, execute the generateconfig utility to produce a ZIP file named "sn2-config.zip" that contains the current configuration of the failed SN (sn2):

    > java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar generateconfig \
           -host host-sn1 -port 13230 \
           -sn sn2 -target /tmp/sn2-config
    

    which creates and populates the file, /tmp/sn2-config.zip.

  4. Install and provision a new machine with the same network configuration as the machine to be replaced; specifically, the same hostname and IP address.

  5. Install the KVStore software on the new machine under KVHOME=/opt/ondb/kv.

  6. If the directory KVROOT=/opt/ondb/var/kvroot exists, then make sure it's empty; otherwise, create it:

    > rm -rf /opt/ondb/var/kvroot
    > mkdir -p /opt/ondb/var/kvroot
    
  7. Copy the ZIP file from host-sn1 to the new host-sn.

    > scp /tmp/sn2-config.zip host-sn2:/tmp
    
  8. On the new host-sn2, install the contents of the ZIP file just copied.

    > unzip /tmp/sn2-config.zip -d /opt/ondb/var/kvroot
    
  9. Restart the sn2 storage node on the new host-sn2 machine, using the old sn2 configuration that was just installed:

    > nohup java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar start \
                 -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot \
                 -config config.xml&
    

    which, after starting the SNA, RN, and admin services, will initiate a (possibly time-consuming) network restore, to repopulate the data stores managed by this new sn2.

Replacement Procedure 2: New SN Takes Over Duties of Removed SN

The procedure presented in this section describes how to deploy a new SN, having a network and SN identity different than all current SNs in the store, that will effectively replace one of the current SNs by taking over that SN's duties and data. Unlike the previous procedure, the only prerequisite that must be satisfied when executing this second procedure is the existence of a working quorum of admin service(s). Also, whereas in the previous procedure the SN to be replaced must be down prior to powering up the replacement SN (because the two SNs share an identity), in this case, the SN to be replaced can remain up and running until the migration step of the process; where the replacement SN finally takes over the duties of the SN being replaced. Thus, although the SN to be replaced can be down throughout the whole procedure if desired, that SN can also be left up so that it can continue to service requests while the replacement SN is being prepared.

Suppose a KVStore has been deployed as described in the section Assumptions. Also, suppose that the sn2 machine is currently up, but needs to be upgraded to a new machine with more memory, larger disks, and better overall performance characteristics. The administrator would then do the following:

  1. From a machine with the Oracle NoSQL Database software installed that has network access to one of the machines running an admin service for the deployed KVStore, start the administrative CLI; connecting it to that admin service. The machine on which the CLI is run can be any of the machines making up the store – even the machine to be replaced – or a separate client machine. For example, if the administrative CLI is started on the sn1 storage node, and one wishes to connect that CLI to the admin service running on that same sn1 host, the following would be typed from a command prompt on the host named, host-sn1:

    > java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar runadmin \
           -host host-sn1 -port 13230
    
  2. From the administrative CLI just started, execute the show pools command to determine the storage node pool the new storage node will need to join after deployment; for example,

    kv-> show pools
    

    which, given the initial assumptions, should produce output that looks like the following:

    AllStorageNodes: sn1 sn2 sn3
    snpool: sn1 sn2 sn3
    

    where, from this output, one should note that the name of the pool the new storage node should join below is "snpool"; and the pool named "AllStorageNodes" is the pool that all storage nodes join by default when deployed.

  3. From the administrative CLI just started, execute the show topology command to determine the zone to use when deploying the new storage node; for example,

    kv-> show topology
    

    which, should produce output that looks like the following:

    store=example-store numPartitions=300 sequence=308
      zn: id=1 name=Zone1 repFactor=3
    
      sn=[sn1] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn1 capacity=1 RUNNING
        [rg1-rn1] RUNNING
    
      sn=[sn2] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn2 capacity=1 RUNNING
        [rg1-rn2] RUNNING
    
      sn=[sn3] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn3 capacity=1 RUNNING
        [rg1-rn3] RUNNING
      ........
    

    where, from this output, one should then note that the id of the zone to use when deploying the new storage node is "1".

  4. Install and provision a new machine with a network configuration that is different than each of the machines currently known to the deployed KVStore. For example, provision the new machine with a hostname such as, host-sn4, and an IP address unique to the store's members.

  5. Install the KVStore software on the new machine under KVHOME=/opt/ondb/kv.

  6. Create the new storage node's KVROOT directory; for example:

    > mkdir -p /opt/ondb/var/kvroot
    
  7. Create the new storage node's data directory on a separate disk than KVROOT; for example:

    > mkdir -p /disk1/ondb/data
    

    Note

    The path used for the data directory of the replacement SN must be identical to the path used by the SN to be replaced.

  8. From the command prompt of the new host-sn4 machine, use the makebootconfig utility (described in Chapter 2 of the Oracle NoSQL Database Administrator's Guide, section, "Installation Configuration") to create an initial configuration for the new storage node that is consistent with the Assumptions specified above; for example:

    > java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar makebootconfig \
           -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot \
           -port 13230  \
           -admin 13231 \
           -host host-sn4
           -harange 13232,13235 \
           -num_cpus 0  \
           -memory_mb 0 \
           -capacity 1  \
           -storagedir /disk1/ondb/data
    

    which produces the file named config.xml, under KVROOT=/opt/ondb/var/kvroot.

  9. Using the configuration just created, start the KVStore software (the SNA and its managed services) on the new host-sn4 machine; for example,

    > nohup java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar start \
                 -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot \
                 -config config.xml &
    
  10. Using the information associated with the sn2 storage node (the SN to replace) that was gathered from the show topology and show pools commands above, use the administrative CLI to deploy the new storage node and join the desired pool; that is,

    kv-> plan deploy-sn -znname Zone1 -host host-sn4 -port 13230 -wait
    kv-> pool join -name snpool -sn sn4
    

    For an SN to join a pool, the SN must have been successfully deployed and the id of the deployed SN must be specified in the pool join command; for example, "sn4" above. But upon examination of the plan deploy-sn, command you can see that the id to assign to the SN being deployed is not specified. This is because it is the KVStore itself – not the administrator – that determines the id to assign to a newly deployed SN. Thus, given that it was assumed that only 3 storage nodes were initially deployed in the example used to demonstrate this procedure, when deploying the next storage node, the system will increment by 1 the integer component of the id assigned to the most recently deployed SN – "sn3" or 3 in this case – and use the result to construct the id to assign to the next SN that is deployed. Hence, "sn4" was assumed to be the id to specify to the pool join command above. But if you want to ascertain the assigned id, then before joining the pool, execute the show topology command which will display the id that was constructed and assigned to the newly deployed SN.

  11. Since the old SN must not be running when the migrate operation is performed (see the next step), if the SN to be replaced is still running at this point, programmatically shut it down, and then power off and disconnect the associated machine. This step can be performed at any point prior to performing the next step. Thus, to shut down the SN to be replaced, type the following from the command prompt of the machine hosting that SN:

    > java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar stop \
           -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot
    

    On completion, the associated machine can then be powered down and disconnected if desired.

  12. After the new storage node has been deployed, joined the desired pool, and the SN to be replaced is no longer running, use the administrative CLI to migrate that old SN to the new SN. This means, in this case, that the SNA, RN and admin services associated with sn4 will take over the duties previously performed in the store by the corresponding services associated with sn2; and the data previously stored by sn2 will be moved – via the network – to the storage directory for sn4. To perform this step then, execute the following command from the CLI:

    kv-> plan migrate-sn -from sn2 -to sn4 -admin-port 13231 [-wait]
    

    In this case, because the old SN had been running an admin service, the admin-port argument must be specified with the same value as that used above for the admin argument in the makebootconfig command. The -wait argument is optional in the command above. If -wait is used, then the command will not return until the full migration has completed; which, depending on the amount of data being migrated, can take a long time. If -wait is not specified, then the show plan -id <migration-plan-id> command is used to track the progress of the migration; allowing other administrative tasks to be performed during the migration.

  13. After the migration process completes, remove the old SN from the store's topology. You can do this by executing the plan remove-sn command from the administrative CLI. For example,

    kv-> plan remove-sn -sn sn2 -wait
    

    At this point, the store should have a structure similar to its original structure; except that the data that was originally stored by sn2 on the host named host-sn2 via that node's rg1-rn2 service, is now stored on host-sn4 by the sn4 storage node (via the migrated service named rg1-rn2 that sn4 now manages).

Examples

In this section, two examples are presented that should allow you to gain some practical experience with the SN replacement procedures presented above. Each example uses the same initial configuration, and is intended to simulate a 3-node KVStore cluster using a single machine with a single disk. Although no machines will actually fail or be physically replaced, you should still get a feel for how the cluster and the data stored by a given SN is automatically recovered when that storage node is replaced using one of the procedures described above.

Assume that a KVStore is deployed in a manner similar to the section Assumptions Specifically, assume that a KVStore is initially deployed using 3 storage nodes - named sn1, sn2, and sn3 – on a single host with IP address represented by the string, <host-ip> where the host's actual IP address (or hostname) is substituted for <host-ip> when running either example. Additionally, since your development system will typically not contain a disk named /disk1 (as specified in the Assumptions section), rather than provisioning such a disk, assume instead that the data written to the store will be stored under /tmp/sn1/disk1, /tmp/sn2/disk1, and /tmp/sn3/disk1 respectively. Finally, since each storage node runs on the same host, assume each storage node is configured with different ports for the services and admins run by those nodes; otherwise, all other assumptions are as stated above in the Assumptions section.

Setup

As indicated above, the initial configuration and setup is the same for each example presented below. Thus, if not done so already, first create the KVROOT directory; that is,

> mkdir -p /opt/ondb/var/kvroot 

Then, to simulate the data disk, create the following directories:

> mkdir -p /tmp/sn1/disk1/ondb/data
> mkdir -p /tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data
> mkdir -p /tmp/sn3/disk1/ondb/data

Next, open 3 windows; Win_A, Win_B, and Win_C, which will represent the 3 machines running each storage node. In each window, execute the makebootconfig command (remembering to substitute the actual IP address or hostname for the string <host-ip>) to create a different, but similar, boot config for each SN that will be configured.

On Win_A

java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar makebootconfig \
     -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot 
     -host <host-ip> \
     -config config1.xml \
     -port 13230 \
     -harange 13232,13235 \
     -admin 13231 \
     -memory_mb 100 \
     -capacity 1 \
     -storagedir /tmp/sn1/disk1/ondb/data

On Win_B

java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar makebootconfig \
     -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot \
     -host <host-ip> \
     -config config2.xml \
     -port 13240 \
     -harange 13242,13245 \
     -admin 13241 \
     -memory_mb 100 \
     -capacity 1 \
     -storagedir /tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data

On Win_C

java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar makebootconfig \
     -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot \
     -host <host-ip> \
     -config config3.xml \
     -port 13250 \
     -harange 13252,13255 \
     -admin 13251 \
     -memory_mb 100 \
     -capacity 1 \
     -storagedir /tmp/sn3/disk1/ondb/data

This will produce 3 configuration files:

/opt/ondb/var/kvroot
    /config1.xml
    /config2.xml
    /config3.xml

Next, using the different configurations just generated, from each window, start a corresponding instance of the KVStore storage node agent (SNA); which, based on the specific configurations generated, will start and manage an admin service and an RN service.

Win_A

> nohup java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar start \
             -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot \
             -config config1.xml &

Win_B

> nohup java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar start \
             -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot \
             -config config2.xml &

Win_C

nohup java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar start \
             -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot \
             -config config3.xml &

Finally, from any window (Win_A, Win_B, Win_C, or a new window), start the KVStore administrative CLI and use it to configure and deploy the store. For example, to start an administrative CLI connected to the admin service that was started above using the configuration employed in Win_A, you would execute the following command:

> java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar runadmin \
       -host <host-ip> -port 13230

To configure and deploy the store, type the following commands from the administrative CLI prompt (remembering to substitute the actual IP address or hostname for the string <host-ip>):

configure -name example-store
plan deploy-zone -name Zone1 -rf 3 -wait
plan deploy-sn -znname Zone1 -host <host-ip> -port 13230 -wait
plan deploy-admin -sn 1 -port 13231 -wait
pool create -name snpool
pool join -name snpool -sn sn1
plan deploy-sn -znname Zone1 -host <host-ip> -port 13240 -wait
plan deploy-admin -sn 2 -port 13241 -wait
pool join -name snpool -sn sn2
plan deploy-sn -znname Zone1 -host <host-ip> -port 13250 -wait
plan deploy-admin -sn 3 -port 13251 -wait
pool join -name snpool -sn sn3
change-policy -params "loggingConfigProps=oracle.kv.level=INFO;"
change-policy -params cacheSize=10000000
topology create -name store-layout -pool snpool -partitions 300
plan deploy-topology -name store-layout -plan-name RepNode-Deploy -wait

Note

The CLI command prompt (kv->) was excluded from the list of commands above to facilitate cutting and pasting the commands into a CLI load script.

When the commands above complete (use show plans to verify each plan's completion), the store is up and running and ready for data to be written to it. Before proceeding though, verify that directories like those shown below have been created and populated:

     - Win_A -                  - Win_B -                - Win_C -

/opt/ondb/var/kvroot      /opt/ondb/var/kvroot      /opt/ondb/var/kvroot
  log files                 log files                 log files
  /example-store            /example-store            /example-store
    /log                      /log                      /log
    /sn1                      /sn2                      /sn3
      config.xml                config.xml                config.xml
      /admin1                   /admin2                   /admin3
        /env                      /env                      /env

/tmp/sn1/disk1/ondb/data  /tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data /tmp/sn3/disk1/ondb/data
  /rg1-rn1                  /rg1-rn2                  /rg1-rn3
    /env                      /env                      /env
      00000000.jdb              00000000.jdb              00000000.jdb 

Because rf=3 for the deployed store, and capacity=1 for each SN in that store, when a key/value pair is initially written to the store, the pair is stored by each of the replication nodes – rn1, rn2, and rn3 – in their corresponding data file named "00000000.jdb"; where each replication node is a member of the replication group – or shard – named rg1; that is, the key/value pair is stored in:

/tmp/sn1/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn1/env/00000000.jdb
/tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn2/env/00000000.jdb
/tmp/sn3/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn3/env/00000000.jdb

At this point in the setup, each file should contain no key/value pairs. Data can be written to the store in a way most convenient. But a utility that is quite handy for doing this is the KVStore client shell utility; which is a process that connects to the desired store and then presents a command line interface that takes interactive commands for putting and getting key/value pairs. To start the KVStore client shell, type the following from a command window (remembering to substitute the actual IP address or hostname for the string <host-ip>):

> java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar runadmin\
       -host <host-ip> -port 13230 -store example-store

kv-> get -all
  0 Record returned.

kv-> put -key /FIRST_KEY -value "HELLO WORLD"
  Put OK, inserted.

kv-> get -all
  /FIRST_KEY
  HELLO WORLD

Although simplistic and not very programmatic, a quick way to verify that the key/value pair was stored by each RN service is to simply grep for the string "HELLO WORLD" in each of the data files; which should work with binary files on most linux systems. Using the "grep" command in this way is practical for examples that consist of only a small amount of data.

> grep "HELLO WORLD" /tmp/sn1/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn1/env/00000000.jdb
  Binary file /tmp/sn1/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn1/env/00000000.jdb matches
> grep "HELLO WORLD" /tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn2/env/00000000.jdb
  Binary file /tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn2/env/00000000.jdb matches
> grep "HELLO WORLD" /tmp/sn3/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn3/env/00000000.jdb
  Binary file /tmp/sn3/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn3/env/00000000.jdb matches

Based on the output above, the key/value pair that was written to the store was stored by each RN service belonging to the shard rg1; that is, each RN service that is a member of the replication group with id equal to 1 (rg1-rn1, rg1-rn2, and rg1-rn3). With which shard a particular key is associated depends on the key's value (specifically, the hash of the key's value) as well as the number of shards maintained by the store (1 in this case). It is also worth noting that although this example shows log files with the name 00000000.jdb, those files are only the first of possibly many such log files containing data written by the corresponding RN service. Over time, as the current log file reaches its maximum capacity, a new file will be created to receive all new data being written. That new file has a name derived from the previous file by incrementing the prefix of the previous file. For example, you might see files with names such as, "..., 00000997.jdb, 00000998.jdb, 00000999.jdb, 00001000.jdb, 00001001.jdb, ...".

Now that data has been written to the store, a failed storage node can be simulated, and an example of the first SN replacement procedure can be performed.

Example 1: Replace a Failed SN with an Identical SN

To simulate a failed storage node, pick one of the storage nodes started above, programmatically stop it's associated processes, and delete all files and directories associated with that process. For example, suppose sn2 is the "failed" storage node. But before stopping the sn2 storage node, you might first (optionally) identify the processes that are running as part of the deployed store; that is:

> jps -m
408 kvstore.jar start -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot -config config1.xml
833 ManagedService -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot -class Admin -service
BootstrapAdmin.13230 -config config1.xml
1300 ManagedService -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/example-store/sn1 -store
example-store -class RepNode -service rg1-rn1
....
563 kvstore.jar start -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot -config config2.xml
1121 ManagedService -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/example-store/sn2
-store example-store -class Admin -service admin2
1362 ManagedService -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/example-store/sn2 
-store example-store -class RepNode -service rg1-rn2
....
718 kvstore.jar start -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot -config config3.xml
1232 ManagedService -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/example-store/sn3 -store
example-store -class Admin -service admin3
1431 ManagedService -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/example-store/sn3 -store
example-store -class RepNode -service rg1-rn3
....

The output above was manually re-ordered for readability. In reality, each process listed may appear in a random order. But it should be noted that each SN from the example deployment corresponds to 3 processes:

  • The SNA process, which is characterized by the string "kvstore.jar start", and identified by the corresponding configuration file; for example, config1.xml for sn1, config2.xml for sn2, and config3.xml for sn3.

  • An admin service is characterized by the string -class Admin , and either a string of the form -service BootstrapAdmin.<port> or a string of the form -service admin<id> (see the explanation below).

  • An RN service characterized by the string -class RepNode along with a string of the form -service rg1-rn<id>; where "<id>" is 1, 2, etc. and maps to the SN hosting the given RN service, and where for a given SN, if the capacity of that SN is N>1, then for that SN, there will be N processes listed that reference a different RepNode service.

Note

With respect to the line in the process list above that references the string -service BootstrapAdmin.<port>, some explanation may be useful. When an SNA starts up and the -admin argument is specified in the configuration, the SNA will initially start what is referred to as a bootstrap admin. Because this example specified the -admin argument in the configuration of all 3 storage nodes, each SNA in the example starts a corresponding bootstrap admin. The fact that the process list above contains only one entry referencing a BootstrapAdmin is explained below.

Recall that Oracle NoSQL Database requires the deployment of at least 1 admin service. If more than 1 such admin is deployed, the admin that is deployed first takes on a special role within the KVStore. In this example, any of the 3 bootstrap admins that were started by the corresponding SNA can be that first deployed admin service. After configuring the store and deploying the zone, the deployer must choose one of the storage nodes that was started and use the plan deploy-sn command to deploy that storage node to the desired zone within the store. After deploying that first storage node, the admin service corresponding to that storage node must then be deployed, using the plan deploy-admin command.

Until that first admin service is deployed, no other storage nodes or admins can be deployed. When that first admin service is deployed to the machine running the first SN (sn1 in this case), the bootstrap admin running on that machine continues running, and takes on the role of the very first admin service in the store. This is why the BootstrapAdmin.<port> process continues to appear in the process list; whereas, as explained below, the processes associated with the other storage nodes are identified by admin2 and admin3 rather than BootstrapAdmin.<port>. It is only after this first admin is deployed that the other storage nodes (and admins) can be deployed.

Upon deployment of any of the other storage nodes, the BootstrapAdmin process associated with each such storage node is shut down and removed from the RMI registry. This is because there is no longer a need for the bootstrap admin on these additional storage nodes. The existence of a bootstrap admin is an indication that the associated SNA can host the first admin if desired. But once the first storage node is deployed and its corresponding bootstrap admin takes on the role of the first admin, the other storage nodes can no longer host that first admin; and so, upon deployment of each additional storage node, the corresponding BootstrapAdmin process is stopped. Additionally, if that first process referencing the BootstrapAdmin is stopped and restarted at some point after the store has been deployed, then the new process will be identified in the process list with the string -class Admin, just like the other admin processes.

Finally, recall that although a store can be deployed with only 1 admin service, it is strongly recommended that multiple admin services be run for greater availability; where the number of admins deployed should be large enough that quorum loss is unlikely in the event of failure of an SN. Thus, as this example demonstrates, after each additional storage node is deployed (and the corresponding bootstrap admin is stopped), a new admin service should then be deployed that will coordinate with the first admin service to replicate the administrative information that is persisted. Hence, the admin service associated with sn1 in the process list above is identified as a BootstrapAdmin (the first admin service), and the other admin services are identified as simply admin2 and admin3.

Thus, to simulate a "failed" storage node, sn2 should be stopped; which is accomplished by typing the following at the command prompt:

> java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar stop \
       -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot \
       -config config2.xml

Optionally, use the jps command to examine the processes that remain; that is,

> jps -m

408 kvstore.jar start -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot
-config config1.xml
833 ManagedService -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot
-class Admin -service BootstrapAdmin.13230 -config config1.xml
1300 ManagedService -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/
example-store/sn1 -store example-store -class RepNode -service rg1-rn1
....
718 kvstore.jar start -root /opt/ondb/var/
kvroot -config config3.xml
1232 ManagedService -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/example-store/
sn3 -store example-store -class Admin -service admin3
1431 ManagedService -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/example-store/
sn3 -store example-store -class RepNode -service rg1-rn3
....

where the processes previously associated with sn2 are no longer running. Next, since the sn2 processes have stopped, the associated files can be deleted as follows:

> rm -rf /tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn2
> rm -rf /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/example-store/sn2

> rm -f /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/config2.xml
> rm -f /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/config2.xml.log
> rm -f /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/snaboot_0.log.1*

> rm -r /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/example-store/log/admin2*
> rm -r /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/example-store/log/rg1-rn2*
> rm -r /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/example-store/log/sn2*
> rm -r /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/example-store/log/config.rg1-rn2
> rm -r /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/example-store/log/example-store_0.*.1*

where the files above that contain a suffix component of "1" (for example, snaboot_0.log.1 and example-store_0.log.1, example-store_0.perf.1,example-store_0.stat.1, etc.) are associated with the sn2 storage node.

Executing the above commands should then simulate a catastrophic failure of the "machine" to which sn2 was deployed; where the configuration and data associated with sn2 is now completely unavailable, and is only recoverable via the deployment of a "new" – and in this example, identical – sn2 storage node. To verify this, execute the show topology command from the administrative CLI previously started; that is,

kv-> show topology

which should produce output that looks like the following:

store=example-store numPartitions=300 sequence=308
  zn: id=1 name=Zone1 repFactor=3

  sn=[sn1] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] <host-ip> capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn1] RUNNING

  sn=[sn2] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] <host-ip> capacity=1 UNREACHABLE
    [rg1-rn2] UNREACHABLE

  sn=[sn3] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] <host-ip> capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn3] RUNNING
  ........

where the actual IP address or hostname appears instead of the string <host-ip>, and observe that sn2 is now UNREACHABLE.

At this point, the first 2 steps of the SN replacement procedure have been executed. That is, because the sn2 processes have been stopped and their associated files deleted, from the point of view of the store's other nodes, the corresponding "machine" is inaccessible and so has been effectively "shut down" (step 1). Additionally, because a single machine is being used in this simulation, we are already logged in to the sn1 (and sn3) host (step 2). Thus, step 3 of the procedure can now be performed. That is, to retrieve the sn2 configuration from one of the store's remaining healthy nodes, execute the following command using the port for one of those remaining nodes (and remembering to substitute the actual IP address or hostname for the string <host-ip>):

> java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar generateconfig \
       -host <host-ip> -port 13230 \ 
       -sn sn2 -target /tmp/sn2-config

Verify that the command above produced the expected zip file:

> ls -al /tmp/sn2-config.zip
-rw-rw-r-- 1 <group> <owner> 2651 2013-07-08 12:53 /tmp/sn2-config.zip

where the contents of /tmp/sn2-config.zip should look something like:

> unzip -t /tmp/sn2-config.zip

Archive: /tmp/sn2-config.zip
testing: kvroot/config.xml  OK
testing: kvroot/example-store/sn2/config.xml  OK
testing: kvroot/example-store/security.policy  OK
testing: kvroot/security.policy  OK
No errors detected in compressed data of /tmp/sn2-config.zip

Next, because this example is being run on a single machine, steps 4, 5, 6, and 7 of the SN replacement procedure have already been performed. Thus, the next step to perform is to install the contents of the ZIP file just generated; that is,

> unzip /tmp/sn2-config.zip -d /opt/ondb/var

which will overwrite kvroot/security.policy and kvroot/example-store/security.policy with identical versions of that file.

When the store was originally deployed, the names of the top-level configuration files were not identical; that is, config1.xml for sn1, config2.xml for the originally deployed sn2, and config3.xml for sn3. This was necessary because, for convenience, all three SNs were deployed using the same KVROOT; which would have resulted in conflict among sn1, sn2, and sn3, had identical names been used for those files. With this in mind, it should then be observed that the generateconfig command executed above produces a top-level configuration file for the new sn2 that has the default name (config.xml), rather than config2.xml. Because both names – config2.xml and config.xml – are unique relative to the names of the configuration files for the store's other nodes, either name can be used in the next step of the procedure (see below). But to be consistent with the way sn2 was originally deployed, the original file name will also be used when deploying the replacement. Thus, before proceeding with the next step of the procedure, the name of the kvroot/config.xml file is changed to kvroot/config2.xml; that is,

> mv /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/config.xml /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/config2.xml

Finally, the last step of the first SN replacement procedure can be performed. That is, a "new" but identical sn2 is started using the old sn2 configuration:

> nohup java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar start \
             -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot \
             -config config2.xml &

Verification

To verify that sn2 has been successfully replaced, first execute the show topology command from the administrative CLI; that is,

kv-> show topology

which should produce output that looks like the following:

store=example-store numPartitions=300 sequence=308
  zn: id=1 name=Zone1 repFactor=3

  sn=[sn1] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] <host-ip> capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn1] RUNNING

  sn=[sn2] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] <host-ip> capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn2] RUNNING

  sn=[sn3] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] <host-ip> capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn3] RUNNING
  ........

where the actual IP address or hostname appears instead of the string <host-ip>, and observe that sn2 is again RUNNING.

In addition to executing the show topology command, you can also verify that the previously removed sn2 directory structure has been recreated and repopulated; that is, directories and files like the following should again exist:

/opt/ondb/var/kvroot
  ....
  config2.xml*
  ....
  /example-store
    /log
      ....
      admin2*
      rg1-rn2*
      sn2*
      config.rg1-rn2
      ....
    /sn2
      config.xml
      /admin2
        /env

/tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data
  /rg1-rn2
    /env
      00000000.jdb

And finally, verify that the data stored previously by the original sn2 has been recovered; that is,

> grep "HELLO WORLD" /tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn2/env/00000000.jdb
  Binary file /tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn2/env/00000000.jdb matches

Example 2: New SN Takes Over Duties of Existing SN

In this example, the second replacement procedure described above will be employed to replace/upgrade an existing, healthy storage node (sn2 in this case) with a new storage node that will take over the duties of the old storage node. As indicated previously, the assumptions and setup for this example are identical to the first example's assumptions and setup. Thus, after setting up this example as previously specified, start an administrative CLI connected to the admin service associated with the sn1 storage node; that is, substituting the actual IP address or hostname for the string <host-ip>, execute the following command:

> java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar runadmin \
       -host <host-ip> -port 13230

Then, from the administrative CLI just started, execute the show pools and show topology commands; that is,

kv-> show pools
kv-> show topology

which should, respectively, produce output that looks something like:

AllStorageNodes: sn1 sn2 sn3
snpool: sn1 sn2 sn3

and

store=example-store numPartitions=300 sequence=308
  zn: id=1 name=Zone1 repFactor=3

  sn=[sn1] zn: [id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn1 capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn1] RUNNING

  sn=[sn2] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn2 capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn2] RUNNING

  sn=[sn3] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn3 capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn3] RUNNING
  ........

Note

At this point, the pool to join is named "snpool", and the id of the zone to deploy to is "1".

Next, recall that in a production environment, where the old and new SNs run on separate physical machines, the old SN would typically remain up – servicing requests – until the last step of the procedure. In this example though, the old and new SNs run on a single machine, where the appearance of separate machines and file systems is simulated. Because of this, the next step to perform in this example is to programmatically shut down the sn2 storage node by executing the following command:

> java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar stop \
       -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot \
       -config config2.xml

After stopping the sn2 storage node, you might (optionally) execute the show topology command and observe that the sn2 storage node is no longer RUNNING; rather, it is UNREACHABLE, but will continue to be referenced in the topology until the node is explicitly removed from the topology (see below). For example, from the administrative CLI, execute the following command:

kv-> show topology

which should produce output that looks like the following:

store=example-store numPartitions=300 sequence=308
  zn: id=1 name=Zone1 repFactor=3

  sn=[sn1] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn1 capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn1] RUNNING

  sn=[sn2] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn2 capacity=1 UNREACHABLE
    [rg1-rn2] UNREACHABLE

  sn=[sn3] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn3 capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn3] RUNNING
  ........

At this point, preparation of the new, replacement sn4 storage node can begin; where steps 4, 5, and 6 of the procedure have already been completed, since a single machine hosts both the old and new SN in this example.

With respect to the next step (7), recall that when employing this procedure, step 7 requires that the path of the replacement SN's data directory must be identical to the path used by the SN to be replaced. But in this example, the same disk and file system is used for the location of the data stored by each SN. Therefore, the storage directory that would be created for the new sn4 storage node in step 7 already exists and has been populated by the old sn2 storage node. Thus, to perform step 7 in this example's simulated environment, as well as to support verification (see below), after shutting down sn2 above, the storage directory used by that node should be renamed; which makes room for the storage directory that needs to be provisioned in step 7 for sn4. That is, type the following at the command line:

> mv /tmp/sn2 /tmp/sn2_old

Note

The renaming step above is performed only for this example, and would never be performed in a production environment.

Next, provision the storage directory that sn4 will use; where the path specified must be identical to the original path of the storage directory used by sn2. That is,

> mkdir -p /tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data

The next step to perform when preparing the replacement SN is to generate a boot configuration for the new storage node by executing the makebootconfig command (remember to substitute the actual IP address or hostname for the string <host-ip>):

java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar makebootconfig \
     -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot \
     -host <host-ip> \
     -config config4.xml \
     -port 13260 \
     -harange 13262,13265 \
     -admin 13261 \
     -memory_mb 100 \
     -capacity 1 \
     -storagedir /tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data

which will produce a configuration file for the new storage node; /opt/ondb/var/kvroot/config4.xml.

After creating the configuration above, use that new configuration to start a new instance of the KVStore storage node agent (SNA), along with its managed services; that is,

> nohup java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar start \
             -root /opt/ondb/var/kvroot \
             -config config4.xml &

After executing the command above, use the administrative CLI to deploy a new storage node by executing the following command (with the actual IP address or hostname substituted for the string <host-ip>):

kv-> plan deploy-sn -znname Zone1 -host <host-ip> -port 13260 -wait

As explained previously, because "sn3" was the id assigned (by the store) to the most recently deployed storage node, the next storage node that is deployed – that is, the storage node deployed by the command above – will be given "sn4" as its assigned id. After deploying the sn4 storage node above, you might then (optionally) execute the show pools command from the administrative CLI and observe that the new storage node has joined the default pool named "AllStorageNodes"; for example:

kv-> show pools

which should produce output that looks like the following:

AllStorageNodes: sn1 sn2 sn3 sn4
snpool: sn1 sn2 sn3

where upon deployment, although sn4 has joined the pool named "AllStorageNodes", it has not yet joined the pool named "snpool".

Next, after successfully deploying the sn4 storage node, use the CLI to join the pool named "snpool"; that is:

kv-> pool join -name snpool -sn sn4

After deploying the new storage node and joining the pool named "snpool", using the administrative CLI, you might (optionally) execute the show topology command followed by the show pools command; and then observe that the new storage node has been deployed to the store and has joined the pool named "snpool"; for example,

kv-> show topology 
kv-> show pools

which, given the initial assumptions, should produce output that looks like the following:

store=example-store numPartitions=300 sequence=308
  zn: id=1 name=Zone1 repFactor=3

  sn=[sn1] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn1 capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn1] RUNNING

  sn=[sn2] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn2 capacity=1 UNREACHABLE
    [rg1-rn2] UNREACHABLE

  sn=[sn3] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn3 capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn3] RUNNING

  sn=[sn4] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn4 capacity=1 RUNNING
  ........

and

AllStorageNodes: sn1 sn2 sn3 sn4
snpool: sn1 sn2 sn3 sn4

The output above shows that the sn4 storage node has been successfully deployed (is RUNNING) and is now a member of the pool named "snpool". But it does not yet include an RN service corresponding to sn4. Such a service will not appear in the store's topology until sn2 is migrated to sn4 (see below).

At this point, after the sn4 storage node is deployed and has joined the pool named "snpool", and the old sn2 storage node has been stopped, sn4 is ready to take over the duties of sn2. This is accomplished by migrating the sn2 services and data to sn4 by executing the following command from the administrative CLI (remembering to substitute the actual IP address or hostname for the string<host-ip>):

kv-> plan migrate-sn -from sn2 -to sn4 -admin-port 13261 -wait

Note

Because the old sn2 storage node was running an admin service, the admin-port argument must be specified to the plan migrate command above; and the value to use for that argument should be the value that was used previously for the admin argument when executing the makebootconfig command to generate the configuration for sn4.

After migrating sn2 to sn4 you might (optionally) execute the show topology command again and observe that the rg1-rn2 service has moved from sn2 to sn4 and is now RUNNING; that is,

kv-> show topology 

store=example-store numPartitions=300 sequence=308
  zn: id=1 name=Zone1 repFactor=3

  sn=[sn1] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn1 capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn1] RUNNING

  sn=[sn2] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn2 capacity=1 UNREACHABLE

  sn=[sn3] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn3 capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn3] RUNNING

  sn=[sn4] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] host-sn4 capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn2] RUNNING
  ........

Finally, after the migration process is complete, remove the old sn2 storage node from the store's topology; which can be accomplished by executing the plan remove-sn command from the administrative CLI in the following way:

kv-> plan remove-sn -sn sn2 -wait

Verification

To verify that sn2 has been successfully replaced/upgraded by sn4, first execute the show topology command from the previously started administrative CLI; that is,

kv-> show topology

The output is like the following:

store=example-store numPartitions=300 sequence=308
  zn: id=1 name=Zone1 repFactor=3

  sn=[sn1] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] <host-ip> capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn1] RUNNING

  sn=[sn3] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] <host-ip> capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn3] RUNNING

  sn=[sn4] zn:[id=1 name=Zone1] <host-ip> capacity=1 RUNNING
    [rg1-rn2] RUNNING
  ........

Here the actual IP address or hostname appears instead of the string <host-ip>, and only sn4 appears in the output rather than sn2.

In addition to executing the show topology command, you can also verify that the expected sn4 directory structure is created and populated; that is, directories and files like the following should exist:

/opt/ondb/var/kvroot
  ....
  config4.xml
  ....
  /example-store
    /log
      ....
      sn4*
      ....
    /sn4
      config.xml
      /admin2
        /env

/tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data
  /rg1-rn2
    /env
      00000000.jdb

You can also verify that the data stored previously by sn2 has been migrated to sn4; that is:

> grep "HELLO WORLD" /tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn2/env/00000000.jdb
  Binary file /tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn2/env/00000000.jdb matches

Note

Although sn2 was stopped and removed from the topology, the data files created and populated by sn2 in this example were not deleted. They were moved under the /tmp/sn2_old directory. Thus, the old sn2 storage directory and data files can still be accessed. That is:

/tmp/sn2_old/disk1/ondb/data
  /rg1-rn2
    /env
      00000000.jdb

And the original key/value pair should still exist in the old sn2 data file; that is,

> grep "HELLO WORLD" \
  /tmp/sn2_old/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn2/env/00000000.jdb
  Binary file 
  /tmp/sn2_old/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn2/env/00000000.jdb
  matches

Finally, the last verification step that can be performed is intended to show that the new sn4 storage node has taken over the duties of the old sn2 storage node. This step consists of writing a new key/value pair to the store and then verifying that the new pair has been written to the data files of sn1, sn3, and sn4, as was originally done with sn1, sn3, and sn2 prior to replacing sn2. To perform this step, you can use the KVStore client shell utility in the same way as described in Setup , when the first key/value pair was initially inserted. That is, you can execute the following (remembering to substitute the actual IP address or hostname for the <host-ip> string):

> java -jar /opt/ondb/kv/lib/kvstore.jar runadmin\
       -host <host-ip> -port 13230 -store example-store

kv-> get -all
  /FIRST_KEY
  HELLO WORLD

kv-> put -key /SECOND_KEY -value "HELLO WORLD 2"
  Put OK, inserted.

kv-> get -all
  /SECOND_KEY
  HELLO WORLD 2
  /FIRST_KEY
  HELLO WORLD

After performing the insertion, use the "grep" command to verify that the new key/value pair was written by sn1, sn3, and sn4; and of course, the old sn2 data file still only contains the first key/value pair. That is,

> grep "HELLO WORLD 2" /tmp/sn1/dsk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn1/env/00000000.jdb
  Binary file /tmp/sn1/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn1/env/00000000.jdb matches
> grep "HELLO WORLD 2" /tmp/sn2/dsk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn2/env/00000000.jdb
  Binary file /tmp/sn2/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn2/env/00000000.jdb matches
> grep "HELLO WORLD 2" /tmp/sn3/dsk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn3/env/00000000.jdb
  Binary file /tmp/sn3/disk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn3/env/00000000.jdb matches
> grep "HELLO WORLD 2"
       /tmp/sn2_old/dsk1/ondb/data/rg1-rn2/env/00000000.jdb